TEAM UP AGAINST CONCUSSIONS

Team Up Against Concussions (formerly known as SLICE) is a free 30-45 minute concussion education program for schools, community centers, and athletic programs. Through Team Up, trained volunteers educate Canadian students in grades 4-12 about concussions through discussion, video, and interactive games. The goal of Team Up is to teach students that successful athletes play hard and play smart. Using an evidence-based bystander intervention model, the program focuses on empowering youth with the knowledge they need to take concussions seriously and foster a safer concussion culture.

Team Up helps young athletes answer questions such as: What is a concussion? Why should I care about concussions? What should I do about concussions?

But.. Is it Effective?

YES. 

The Team Up program has been shown to effectively increase concussion knowledge.

 
93% of students agreed or strongly agreed, “Because of the presentation, I’m more likely to tell a friend or coach if I think I have a concussion
 

2012:  93% of students agreed or strongly agreed, “Because of the presentation, I’m more likely to tell a friend or coach if I think I have a concussion” and 89% of students agreed or strongly agreed, “Because of the presentation, I’m more likely to tell a coach if I think one of my teammates has a concussion.”

2014: research presented at the National Neurotrauma Conference meeting in San Fransicso determined kids retained their knowledge gains for at least one month, without any homework, follow up lessons, or reinforcement. 

To view current and upcoming Team Up Chapters click here.

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TEAM UP SPEAK UP

Team Up Speak Up Day is a social media driven initiative to raise awareness for concussion recognition. The key messaging for this initiative is that athletes have a responsibility to their team to report when they suspect a teammate is suffering from a head injury. The speech is simple and includes three basic tenants:

1) We’re a team and we look out for each other

2) A teammate with a concussion needs your help

3) It is your responsibility to speak up to a coach or athletic therapist if you think your teammate might have a concussion

Learn more about Team Up Speak Up Day and take the Team Up pledge here.

You can learn more about Team Up Speak Up Day in Canada here: 2017, 2018.

ADVANCED CONCUSSION TRAINING

The Concussion Legacy Foundation Advanced Concussion Training is the national gold standard for concussion education for coaches, parents, administrators, health professionals, athletes, and concerned citizens.

Advanced Concussion Training (ACT) is a 60-90 minute comprehensive concussion educational seminar customized for your organization. Using curriculum developed by Concussion Legacy Foundation co-founders Christopher Nowinski and Dr. Robert Cantu, each seminar provides the information and inspiration to play safer sports through a multimedia presentation provided by trained staff.

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BRAINS AND BRAWN CAMPS

Concussion Legacy Foundation Canada’s flagship educational program, Brains and Brawn Concussion Camp, is a one-of-a-kind experience connecting professional and/or varsity athletes with youth athletes for a day of skill development and concussion education.

Brains and Brawns Camps consist of hands on skills sessions followed by a Team Up Against Concussions presentation. Professional and/or varisty athletes present to youth athletes, while parents and coaches receive an Advanced Concussion Training session in parallel from trained staff. The Brains and Brawn Concussion Camps are available for hockey, soccer, football, rugby, and lacrosse. 

View photos from our 2013 camp lead by Hamilton Tiger-Cats Andy Fantuz and Brian Bulcke .

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BASH FOR BRAINS ALL STAR PARTIES

These fundraising events are held across Canada. The raucous parties are hosted by athletes and celebrities to support safety in sports.

SCHULICH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY INITIATIVE: SEE THE LINE: CONCUSSION AND RESEARCH AWARENESS

See the Line is a Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry initiative which is presented in partnership with London Health Sciences Centre, Fowler Kennedy Sports Medicine Clinic, Western University, Children’s Health Foundation, Brain Injury Association of London and Region, Robarts Research, St. Joseph’s Health Care Foundation, Lawson Health Research Intitute, and the Children’s Health Research Institute.

See the Line seamlessly encompasses world-class concussion healthcare and research partners from across London’s healthcare community. This unprecedented collaboration leverages each partner’s collective strength in research, patient care, education, and training, and uniquely positions London as a leader in concussion research and awareness.

The See the Line collaboration will translate research discoveries into innovative healthcare solutions, and provide a better understanding of the risk concussion injuries present.

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HIT COUNT®

THE FACTS

If we know how many hits our children take, we’ll be able to reduce the number. If we reduce the number of hits, we’ll reduce concussions. If we reduce concussions, we’ll protect our athletes.

COUNT EVERY HIT, BECAUSE EVERY HIT COUNTS

In the last several years, new sensor devices that track head impacts have given us an extra set of eyes on athletes. Recognizing a major opportunity to protect athletes, the Concussion Legacy Foundation launched the Hit Count program, which developed an innovative way to track the number of times an athlete is hit in the head – the Hit Count®.

A PITCH COUNT FOR THE BRAIN

There is no such thing as a concussion detector. Since there is no universal threshold for concussion, no impact sensor can yet reliably predict which hits will cause a concussion and which won’t. What they can do is reliably track the number of hits to the head, which we call a Hit Count. Experts agree that any hit over 10G almost always represents abnormal, and potentially dangerous, brain trauma. The vision of Hit Count is to count every impact and to give this information directly to parents and coaches so they can use this valuable metric to devise ways to play sports more safely. By limiting the Hit Count, we should reduce the number of concussions and subconcussive brain injuries. Just like a pitch count protects a pitcher’s elbow, limiting the number of hits an athlete takes will protect their brain.